L ooking at your relatives’ medical histories is like peering into a crystal ball. You get a glimpse at your future but not the whole picture. You can’t change the genes you inherited, but you can avoid habits that contributed to your family’s health problems.

“Some people can have a family history of heart disease, but it’s actually a history of smoking, overeating, and [an inactive] lifestyle. And if you adopt that lifestyle, you’re going to run into the same problems your parents did,” says James Pacala, MD. He is the associate head of the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Minnesota.

Take preventive action now to help make sure you’re healthy into your 60s, 70s, 80s, and beyond. “You must remain active and engaged. By that, I mean physically and mentally active and socially engaged,” says Pacala, who is also president of the American Geriatrics Society. He ticks off the necessities: aerobic and resistance exercises, a balanced diet that’s low in saturated fat and high in fruits and vegetables, and brain games and social outings to keep you sharp.

You also want to try to avoid diseases. “Get your immunizations, your cancer screening tests, your cardiac and osteoporosis risk factors assessed before you have those problems,” Pacala says.

We’ve all seen 70- and 80-year-olds who look and act decades younger. How do they do it? Pacala shares a few secrets.

Refuse to take it slow. “There’s a sort of societal expectation that you’re supposed to slow down as you get old, and I think you should fight against that,” Pacala says. “Don’t let your grandkids get up and mow the lawn for you and get you a glass of water. Get up and do it yourself.”

Take a daily walk. Even if your pace is gentle and the distance is short, the time spent on your feet will help keep your bones strong.

Read the newspaper with your morning bowl of oatmeal. Keeping your mind engaged could ward off the brain changes that lead to Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, while the whole grains in your bowl help prevent heart disease.

Downsize your portions. Overeating leads to obesity and diabetes, which can shorten your lifespan. An overstuffed plate has also been linked to memory loss in people 70 and older.

source

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