If you are a heart patient, it is crucial that you discuss this with your doctor so that he can give you the correct guidelines and medication (if needed). The following are basic guidelines but should only be followed once you have a clear sexual activity plan from your doctor. The other thing that needs to be stressed as that you should also consult your doctor about enrolling in a cardiovascular rehabilitation program.
What researchers have found is that your risk of getting a heart attack during sex is low, but that this risk will be reduced even further if you exercise regularly.

Some handy tips: During intercourse use positions that are the most comfortable to you – that is the most important thing. You must feel comfortable and relaxed during sex. It is normally recommended that patients must wait at least a month after a heart attack before resuming sexual activity, but it is best to check this with your doctor as the recovery time differs from person to person.

When to avoid sex after a heart attack

  • after substantial intakes of food or alcohol
  • when fatigued
  • when under time pressure
  • during emotional outbursts
  • when under emotional stress
  • under temperature extremes

Also: see your doctor if you have a persistent pain in your heart during intercourse, a rapid heart rate or you experience difficulty in breathing that persists for 7 to 10 minutes after orgasm. Also if you feel very tired after orgasm or can’t get or maintain an erection.

References
Bancroft, J. (1989) Human sexuality and its problems. Churchill Livingstone, ISBN: 0-443-03455-9
Milsten, R. & Slowinski, J. (1999) The sexual male. Problems and solutions. Norton, ISBN: 0-393-04740-7
Muller, J.E. et al. (1996) Triggering myocardial infarction by sexual activity. Low absolute risk and prevention by regular physical exertion. Journal of the American Medical Association; 275: 1405-1409
Schover, L.R. & Jensen, S.B. (1988) Sexuality and chronic illness. A comprehensive approach. The Guilford Press, ISBN: 0-89862-715-X
Sipski, M.L. & Alexander, C.J. (1997) Sexual function in people with disability and chronic illness. Aspen Publishers, Inc., ISBN: 0-8342-0886-5

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